Continuing Outdoor Lifestyle During a Pandemic – 5 ways to get your adventure on!

As Covid-19 is turning our lives upside down and changing up our daily lives, there is more time than ever to get outside. Even if bigger out-of-state trips are not recommended, we don’t have to hang up our hiking boots. We don’t have to say farewell to adventure. There is plenty of nature-time to be had locally! From quiet reflective activities to adrenaline-rush, fast-paced activities, being outdoors boosts mental and physical health, which is more important during this stressful and uncertain time than ever. In this post, I’m going to share five outdoor activities I’ve been enjoying to hopefully inspire you to get out in nature or try something new 🙂 I’ll also be including my favorite local outdoor locations for anyone who lives in the TriTown area. … More Continuing Outdoor Lifestyle During a Pandemic – 5 ways to get your adventure on!

Beginning the Maine 4,000 Footers With Old Speck – including my GoPro Edit!

New Hampshire 4,000 footers? Check. Maine 4,000 footers? Officially in progress.

I just hiked my very first Maine 4,000 footer, Old Speck, and felt elated to be on top of a new peak again. I had a beautiful bluebird sunny day for the Saturday hike and the temperature was in the 50s. But, don’t be fooled by the nice weather. There’s still a 4 foot snow pack in the high elevations! And, thank god for microspikes!
*Read to the end to see my GoPro edit of this hike!* … More Beginning the Maine 4,000 Footers With Old Speck – including my GoPro Edit!

Sharing my Passion

Since large destination hikes are discouraged during this quarantine period, I’ve spent some time reflecting while I’m at home doing my part to flatten the curve. What keeps coming up in my mind is a really fulfilling hiking-related experience I had in the fall. I had wanted to write about it in the fall, but I was very busy with schoolwork and then ski season started up. But now that I’ve had time to think and write, I’d like to share it here! … More Sharing my Passion

it’s still winter in the mountains!

It may be May, but the White Mountains have a mind of themselves when it comes to seasons. From the time that I saw snow in the summer to my experiences navigating the independently functioning weather system of Franconia Notch, these mountains never seem to abide by the seasons. So, I was not surprised at all to find over three feet of snow layering the Tripyramids on this spring day in mid-May. … More it’s still winter in the mountains!

appreciating watermelon and the woods

My cousin just signed up for a week of hiking and rock climbing in Utah and listening to his enthusiasm brought me back to my adventure memories from last summer with Outward Bound. From sleeping under a floor-less tarp, to powdering our trench feet, to catching eddies on the white water, my nine days in the wilderness were, well… it’s hard to even come up with a word to capture it all! This January, I received in the mail the letter I had written to myself during my solo (when I opened it, clumps of dirt and a folded leaf the length or my forearm fell out all over my bed), and it really made me think and look back upon my experiences. I wrote this piece about Outward Bound and I wanted to share it, so, here goes! … More appreciating watermelon and the woods

off trail on owl’s head

Perched on a wooden shelf in my house, the maps of the White Mountains lay wrinkled, their edges beginning to wear from years of reference. Lined up against each other, each map displays in detail different sections of the mountains. Before each hike, we always press the map we need out against the kitchen table, drawing our finger up and down the contour lines. We zip it into pack pockets, pull it out in front of the steering wheel, and occasionally at trail intersections. You see, the main goal of the maps is to orient yourself against established hiking trails. While the red lines are any map’s focal point and have even sparked the creation of “red liners,” hikers who strive to lay their bootprints across every trail, it’s often the terrain off the trail that seems to be the most compelling.

As I was planning out my path up to the peak of Owl’s Head, the red lines were little help. They led my finger in loops around the route that I wanted to take, and up an incredibly dangerous ice slide in the winter. The real and only way to ascend Owl’s Head in the winter is through a course of two bushwacks.

More off trail on owl’s head

Hiker Feature: Alex and Sage Herr

Featuring… Alex and Sage Herr, aka the Granite Gals! I first met these incredible hikers through Facebook after they saw my blog and wanted to interview me for their podcast, granitegals.org.  Their podcast features a new female New Hampshire hiker each month. We arranged a time and met in person in a field behind a ropes course park in N.H. so they could interview me about my hiking experiences. After having learned about their jaw-dropping accomplishments and experiences, I decided to interview them as well and post a q&a on my blog!  … More Hiker Feature: Alex and Sage Herr

Living in the North Carolina Forest for 9 Days; My Experience at Outward Bound

I’ve always loved to lie in my window-side bed at night, curled up in my fuzzy blankets, listening to a storm rage by. Sheets of rain rap against my window, and wind beats against the other side of my wall. For as long as I can remember, I have loved to lie against that wall, placing my hand up to the few inches of wood and insulation that protect me from the mighty storm. Looking out my window, I feel sheltered; safe- as if I am savoring warm soup on a chilly fall day.

Beneath my open-air tarp on my 9-day Outward Bound trip in the Pisgah Forest of North Carolina, I felt a different mix of emotions when bullets of rain pounded down inches above my face, creating that loud noise of water vs tarp. I did not feel as warm and snuggly as I shivered in my wet sleeping bag, batting moths and beetles away from my headlamp. I can’t quite describe the emotions I felt as I watched with wide open eyes- the battle between nature and tarp. Spoiler Alert: Tarps do not always win. … More Living in the North Carolina Forest for 9 Days; My Experience at Outward Bound

Venturing Above Treeline

They don’t call it Mt. Isolation because it’s easy to get to. By the time you’re at the peak, you’re at least six miles from civilization in all directions, surrounded by the towering Presidential Mountain Range, and well, covered in dirt. At only 4,004 feet, it’s the second shortest 4,000 footer, but by taking the Glen Boulder Trail, I had to hike up over a 5,000+ foot ridge that leads to Mt. Washington and other Presidential mountains, then descend to the peak. I have to admit; it feels a little weird to work so hard to get over 5,000 feet, only to drop 1,000 feet to actually summit. There are two ways up Mt. Isolation; a longer but steadier direct route, or a steeper, wilder, rocky route chock full of peaks and valleys. My dad and I went with the latter. … More Venturing Above Treeline