An Unexpected Slowpoke

Eight miles sounds like a short hike for a 4,000-footer. It sounds like a fast-paced bound up and around the ridge. A peak grab. An in-and-out.                                     

What it does not sound like is heaving yourself over boulders, scrambling through ice caves, running out of breath. Eight miles does not sound like New Hampshire’s second highest peak. Yet it is.  … More An Unexpected Slowpoke

Venturing Above Treeline

They don’t call it Mt. Isolation because it’s easy to get to. By the time you’re at the peak, you’re at least six miles from civilization in all directions, surrounded by the towering Presidential Mountain Range, and well, covered in dirt. At only 4,004 feet, it’s the second shortest 4,000 footer, but by taking the Glen Boulder Trail, I had to hike up over a 5,000+ foot ridge that leads to Mt. Washington and other Presidential mountains, then descend to the peak. I have to admit; it feels a little weird to work so hard to get over 5,000 feet, only to drop 1,000 feet to actually summit. There are two ways up Mt. Isolation; a longer but steadier direct route, or a steeper, wilder, rocky route chock full of peaks and valleys. My dad and I went with the latter. … More Venturing Above Treeline

Zealand on Zealand

Mt. Zealand. 4,260 feet. 11 miles. My 35th 4,000-footer.  Wait- did I say 11 miles? I meant to say 16.5, which is a pretty big difference considering a hiking mile is often rocky, steep, technical, and fairly difficult as you are lugging pounds of your food and water. So I was pretty shocked too when my 11-mile hike spiked to a 16.5-mile trek. … More Zealand on Zealand